WHO South-East Asia Journal of Public Health
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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 59-68

Pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 in Thailand


1 Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University; Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
3 Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
4 Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University; Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
5 Bureau of Epidemiology, Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Aronrag Meeyai
Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University; Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Bangkok
Thailand
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DOI: 10.4103/2224-3151.206915

PMID: 28612779

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Background: Developing a quantitative understanding of pandemic influenza dynamics in South-East Asia is important for informing future pandemic planning. Hence, transmission dynamics of influenza A/H1N1 were determined across space and time in Thailand. Methods: Dates of symptom onset were obtained for all daily laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza A/H1N1pdm in Thailand from 3 May 2009 to 26 December 2010 for four different geographic regions (Central, North, North-East, and South). These data were analysed using a probabilistic epidemic reconstruction, and estimates of the effective reproduction number, R(t), were derived by region and over time. Results: Estimated R(t) values for the first wave peaked at 1.54 (95% CI: 1.42-1.71) in the Central region and 1.64 (95% CI: 1.38-1.92) in the North, whilst the corresponding values in the North-East and the South were 1.30 (95% CI: 1.17-1.46) and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.32-1.45) respectively. As the R(t) in the Central region fell below one, the value of R(t) in the rest of Thailand increased above one. R(t) was above one for 30 days continuously through the first wave in all regions of Thailand. During the second wave R(t) was only marginally above one in all regions except the South. Conclusions: In Thailand, the value of R(t) varied by region in the two pandemic waves. Higher R(t) estimates were found in Central and Northern regions in the first wave. Knowledge of regional variation in transmission potential is needed for predicting the course of future pandemics and for analysing the potential impact of control measures.


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